'Terrorists spreading rumours'

KOTA KINABALU - Sulu terrorists could be spreading rumours in Sabah to taunt Malaysian security forces.

Sabah police commissioner Datuk Hamza Taib yesterday said this was how the terrorists engage others in their psychological warfare.

"Look at Agbimuddin (Kiram) who led the intrusion into Lahad Datu on Feb 12, he has yet to surface, but we believe he is hiding in the Philippines," he said, adding that there were many versions as to his whereabouts.

"I believe he is hiding because he fears that there may be people who are not happy with him, even in his own country," Hamza said after the first state Security Council meeting for the year, chaired by Chief Minister Datuk Seri Musa Aman.

Hamza said this after confirming that a letter by the General Operations Force that 80 people from southern Philippines had entered Sabah via Sandakan had been circulated via social media.

He said police would investigate how the letter had been leaked to the public.

"This was the information we received and distributed to our police officers so that they could verify whether the information was true.

"So far, there have been no such intrusions. Whatever information we get, we will ensure Sabah is safe from such threats."

On the meeting, Musa said it was held to look into security issues across the state, which involved all enforcement agencies and security forces.

"Sabah is safe and security is under control.

"The rumours on plans by the Sulu terrorist to launch a second wave of attacks in Sabah can be damaging."

He added that the government and the authorities would ensure that security in Sabah was maintained, and stressed that stern action would be taken against those who spread rumours.

"The public can help maintain peace and security by becoming the eyes and ears for the government.

"They should inform the authorities if they see or hear of any suspicious group.

"The people need to play their part and be united to strengthen security in the state," Musa said.

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