'No foul play in baby's death'

Cyndi Koay Xin Lin’s father, identified only as Kong, consoling his wife, Oon Fu Fong, at the Bukit Mertajam Hospital mortuary.

BUKIT MERTAJAM - Police have ruled out foul play in the incident in which an infant choked on milk at her babysitter's house here on Monday.

Seberang Perai Tengah district police chief Assistant Commissioner Azman Abd Lah said the post-mortem confirmed that the 5-month-old baby girl had choked on milk. He said doctors found traces of milk inside Cyndi Koay Xin Lin's lungs.

"Initial investigations showed there was no foul play and we have classified the case as sudden death.

"We have recorded the statements from the infant's parents and the babysitter.

"However, we will continue our investigations."

Earlier, about 20 people, mostly relatives, congregated at the Berapit cemetery to pay their last respects to Xin Lin.

Xin Lin's mother, Oon Fu Fong, 42, and her husband identified only as Kong, 50, were in tears and declined to speak to reporters.

According to a relative, who declined to be named, the infant's body was cremated at 9am after Buddhist last rites.

She said the ashes would be kept at the Berapit columbarium here.

The relative also said the couple were trying to have a baby 10 years before Xin Lin and her twin sister the finally came.

"They had tried so hard to get pregnant, including going for in-vitro fertilisation, before they had the twins early this year."

She said in the 11am incident, the babysitter had telephoned Xin Lin's parents informing the couple that their daughter was unconscious and her face had turned blue.

The babysitter had also attempted to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the baby but was unsuccessful.

Kong, a secondary school teacher in Berapit, rushed to the babysitter's home and took Xin Lin to a clinic, where she was pronounced dead.

She said the twins' parents knew the babysitter, in her 40s, after they were recommended by friends.

"They had sent their children to the babysitter since four months ago," she said adding that Xin Lin and her older twin sister were the granddaughters of a prominent Datuk who owned a Chinese medicine factory here.