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Singapore's first locally made satellite launched into space

It was lifted off onboard India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle from a space centre in India. -AsiaOne

Wed, Apr 20, 2011
AsiaOne

Singapore's first micro-satellite, X-SAT, was launched into space today at 12.42 pm from a space centre in Andhra Pradesh, India.

It was lifted off onboard India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle PSLV-C16 from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre.

The X-SAT was developed and built by the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) - in collaboration with DSO National Laboratories.

According to a statement released by NTU, the micro-satellite was one of the two "piggyback" mission satellites loaded on the PSLV-C16 rocket.

The PSLV-C16 successfully inserted the X-SAT into its planned orbit around the Earth.

"We are delighted with the successful launch of Singapore's first experimental micro-satellite into space. This represents a huge leap for our local research and development endeavours in space technology and building micro-satellites," said NTU President Dr Su Guaning.

"We hope that the successful launch of X-SAT will excite and inspire more of our youths to take up engineering, and possibly venture into space technology".

The NTU team members involved in the X-SAT project are currently trying to establish communication contact with the satellite from the Mission Control Station at NTU's Research Techno Plaza.

Once contact with X-SAT is established, an initial health status of the satellite will be ascertained and confirmed.

This experimental micro-satellite carries three payloads, namely an imaging system, an advanced navigation experimental set-up, and a parallel processing unit for image processing experiments.

Weighing 105kg, the X-SAT is designed to demonstrate technologies related to satellite based remote sensing and onboard image processing. It has a mission life of three years.

 
 
 
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