Parliament 2014: New powers for aviation agency

Minister for Transport Lui Tuck Yew (second from right) during the commissioning ceremony of the Lorads III, a new air traffic control simulator, held at the Singapore Aviation Academy on September 3, 2012. The new simulator is part of the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore's $300-million next-generation Long Range Radar and Display System III.

THE Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) has been given new powers and tools to perform its role more effectively.

It can now detain an engine or other equipment on an aircraft, as long as it has reasonable grounds to believe that operating the aircraft or aeronautical product may endanger people or property.

Before changes to the Air Navigation Act passed on Monday, the CAAS could only detain an entire aircraft.

As a safeguard, the amended Act will provide a right of appeal against the detention, said Senior Minister of State for Transport Josephine Teo.

The CAAS will also get a wider range of tools to ensure people or companies comply with the law. It can now impose financial penalties and new licensing conditions, and issue provisional orders.

Previously, it could only prosecute, suspend or revoke certificates, licences or permits. The Act was also brought in line with new rules and standards spelt out by the International Civil Aviation Organisation.

The CAAS Act 2009 was also amended to clarify the responsibilities of the regulator and the Transport Ministry.

While the CAAS will regulate aviation safety, the ministry will continue to investigate air accidents and incidents, regulate aviation security and provide licences for air services.


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