7 more things you need to know about Thailand travel during the mourning period

7 more things you need to know about Thailand travel during the mourning period
PHOTO: AFP

Your travel plans to Thailand may need to be adjusted now that the country is in a state of mourning. Find out what key events and festivities are affected, as well as how to be a respectful tourist during the year-long period of mourning.

Read also: Do's and don'ts for tourists during mourning period for Thai King

DRESS RESPECTFULLY

Most Thai people will be wearing black or white during the period of mourning. Although no specific dress code has been imposed on visitors, it is best to wear sombre colours and to avoid short or revealing clothes.

Swimwear should still be acceptable if worn at the beach though.

MOST TOURIST ATTRACTIONS WILL BE OPEN, EXCEPT THESE

The Grand Palace, including the Wat Phra Kaeo (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) will be closed until Nov 1 as they are involved in the royal funeral rites.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The Ratchadamnoen Boxing Stadium and Lumpinee Boxing Stadium Ramintra Bangkok will also be closed until Nov 1.

Other tourist attractions will generally be open as usual ─ take care not to fall prey to Bangkok's temple scams!

HOW TO PAY YOUR RESPECTS

on Facebook

How to Behave in Thailand After the King’s Death LATEST UPDATES 1 - Check the STATUS OF EVENTS & FESTIVALs (As of 22...

Posted by Thai To You on Friday, 14 October 2016

Those who wish to pay their respects or write messages of condolences can do so at the Grand Palace. Check the Tourism Authority of Thailand site for details.

NUMEROUS MUSIC EVENTS AND PARTIES HAVE BEEN CANCELLED

on SPH Brightcove

Out of respect for the king's passing, numerous entertainment activities have already been cancelled.

The October edition of Thailand's famous full moon party was cancelled, and the November date rescheduled; The Urban Music Festival, as well as concerts by the Scorpions and Big Bang have been cancelled; the World Film Festival that was set for November has been postponed; certain cultural events, like the colourful Loi Krathong have also been suspended.

Check the respective event websites and Facebook pages to find out if your travel plans have ben affected.

LOWER YOUR EXPECTATIONS OF NIGHTLIFE ACTIVITIES

on SPH Brightcove

The Thai government has requested nightlife venues ─ bars, clubs etc ─ to review their opening hours during this time of mourning. While there are no formal regulations, with the businesses having the final say, we reckon that nightlife spots might be more subdued, or have shortened opening hours during the mourning period ─ perhaps not for the full year, but at least for the first 30 days of the mourning period.

BE ON YOUR BEST BEHAVIOUR

On that note, it's probably best not to be drunk or rowdy when you're out and about.

DON'T MAKE REMARKS ABOUT THE ROYAL FAMILY IN PUBLIC

A look back at Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej's life

  • Open gallery

    King Bhumibol Adulyadej is the world's longest-reigning monarch. His health has been fragile and he has not appeared in public for months.

  • Open gallery

    King Ananda Mahidol (pictured here), 20, is found dead in his palace bedroom in Bangkok with a single gunshot wound in the head from a Colt .45 he kept by his bedside. His death shocks the nation. Within hours, his brother Bhumibol Adulyadej, 18, is named the new king. He returns to Switzerland to continue his studies while an uncle acts as regent. The case is later ruled as murder, and two royal servants and a personal secretary of the former king are convicted and executed for plotting to assassinate him.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej being carried by a cortege during the coronation ceremony in Thailand. Taken on May 5, 1950.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Queen Sirikit posing with their first child Princess Ubol Ratana in April 1951.

  • Open gallery

    (on left) Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej receiving flowers from a villager.

  • Open gallery

    (on right) Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Queen Sirikit posing with their first two children Princess Ubol Ratana and Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn in 1955.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej (centre) on the throne at the Grand Palace in Bangkok.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej taking a picture during his trip to Cambodia. Taken on July 7, 1980

  • Open gallery

    Japanese Emperor Akihito (second from right) and Empress Michiko (second from left) posing with Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej (right) and Queen Sirikit at the Grand Palace in Bangkok. Taken on Sept 25, 1991.

  • Open gallery

    King Bhumibol Adulyadej receiving garlands from villagers. Photo made available by the Thai Royal Bureau on June 5, 2006.

  • Open gallery

    (From left) Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej, Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn and Queen Sirikit appearing at a balcony of Anantasamakom Throne Hall in Bangkok to mark the King's birthday. Taken on Dec 5, 1999.

  • Open gallery

    Tennis player Paradorn Srichaphan (left) being granted a royal audience with Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Chitralada Palace in Bangkok.

  • Open gallery

    French President Jacques Chirac (right) speaking to Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at the start of a gala dinner at the Royal Palace in Bangkok. Taken on Feb 17, 2006.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej and his wife Queen Sirikit (left) reviewing the guard of honour during the military parade to celebrate his 81st birthday in Bangkok, Thailand. Taken on Dec 2, 2008.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej as he sits on a wheelchair during an appearance at a hospital in Bangkok on Oct 23, 2009.

  • Open gallery

    Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong meeting King Bhumibol at his palace in Hua Hin in 2009.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej waving to well-wishers after the royal ceremony for his 83rd birthday in Bangkok. Taken on Dec 5, 2010.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej (centre) sitting in a wheelchair as he departs Siriraj hospital to grant an audience on his 85th birthday celebrations in Bangkok, Thailand on Dec 5, 2012.

  • Open gallery

    Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej (centre), Queen Sirikit (second from right) and Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn (right) visiting Thung Makham. Taken on May 25, 2012.

  • Open gallery

    King Bhumibol has been on the throne since 1946. A well-wisher was among those who prayed for his well-being in Bangkok on Oct 10, 2016.

  • Open gallery

    On Oct 10, 2016, well-wishers pray in front of a picture of King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok where he is usually treated when ill.

  • Open gallery

    A well-wisher at Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok, where the king is treated when his health condition is serious.

  • Open gallery

    Images of King Bhumibol were held during a parade at a festival in Narathiwat on Sep 17, 2016.

  • Open gallery

    King Bhumibol has been in hospital since the end of May and has received treatment for various ailments.

  • Open gallery

    Well-wishers held up portraits of King Bhumibol at Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok on Oct 10, 2016.

  • Open gallery

    The king was last seen in public on Jan 11, 2016, when he left hospital to visit his Bangkok palace for a few hours.

  • Open gallery

    The king is widely adored by many Thais, who revere him as a semi-divine figure.

  • Open gallery

    This exquisite cigarette box was a gift from King Bhumibol to Singapore's President S R Nathan in 2005. It is displayed at the Istana Heritage Gallery.

  • Open gallery

    King Bhumibol welcoming President S R Nathan in his state visit in 2005.

  • Open gallery

    Former Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew ande Mrs Lee meeting King Bhumibol at his palace in Bangkok in 1998.

  • Open gallery

    The king has been treated for various ailments during a year-long hospitalisation in the Thai capital.

  • Open gallery

    Many Thais see the king as a pillar of stability in a country which has seen bouts of political unrest over the past decade following the downfall of former prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra.

  • Open gallery

    Women offer prayers for Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Siriraj Hospital, where the king is being treated, in Bangkok on October 11, 2016.

  • Open gallery

    Women offer prayers for Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Siriraj Hospital, where the king is being treated, in Bangkok on October 11, 2016.

  • Open gallery

    Women hold portraits of Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej as they pray for his health at Siriraj Hospital, where the king is being treated, in Bangkok on October 11, 2016.

  • Open gallery

    Thai citizens started wearing pink en masse as soon as word spread that the colour has "auspicious power" for their beloved King's good health.

  • Open gallery

    Many people wearing pink headed to the Siriraj Hospital to write get-well messages and pray for His Majesty to recover.

  • Open gallery

    Many people wearing pink headed to the Siriraj Hospital to write get-well messages and pray for His Majesty to recover.

  • Open gallery

    Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha along with his wife, plus military leaders, members of the National Council for Peace and Order, and Cabinet ministers, left well-wishes for the monarch at Sala Sahathai Samakhom in the Grand Palace, while wearing pink and yellow.

  • Open gallery

    Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha along with his wife, plus military leaders, members of the National Council for Peace and Order, and Cabinet ministers, left well-wishes for the monarch at Sala Sahathai Samakhom in the Grand Palace, while wearing pink and yellow.

  • Open gallery

    Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha along with his wife, plus military leaders, members of the National Council for Peace and Order, and Cabinet ministers, left well-wishes for the monarch at Sala Sahathai Samakhom in the Grand Palace, while wearing pink and yellow.

Thailand has one of the strictest lese majeste laws, and complaints can be filed by anyone against anyone. The Thai people have great reverence for their late king, and sensitivity towards any perceived insults or critical remarks about the royal family or succession may be heightened during this time of mourning, so be very careful about what you say.

You really can't be sure if someone else might misinterpret your words ─ even if they seemed like innocent, curious questions or joking remarks.

 

More about

Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.