Donald Trump starring in weird Australian ads? Feels like a lifetime ago

PHOTO: Reuters

Remember when Donald Trump was just a rich dude who was the host of The Apprentice, and got paid lots of money to appear on TV commercials in Australia?

Feels like a lifetime ago, but it happened.

Take this 2004 ad for socks, which journalist Amy Remeikis brought back to light on Twitter recently.

It features Trump, in his own private jet, complaining about his stocks "always going down" and wanting recommendations on other companies to invest in.

An offsider with an Australian accent remarks about his Holeproof-branded computer socks - an oddly fascinating name for hosiery - never going down.

Trump mistakes what he said as "computer stocks."

"You know what Jerry, go out and get some computer stocks. They never go down!" Trump said.

Trump was apparently paid A$250,000 (S$270,000) for the appearance, which consisted of a half-day of shooting, according to Ant Shannon of ad agency Creative Outlet, who created the commercial.

"He actually liked the gag about getting 'computer stocks' mixed up with socks," Shannon told the Sydney Morning Herald.

The now-US president agreed to do the ad as it would help his presence Down Under, where he was reportedly planning to build a golf resort.

Trump sworn in as 45th US president

  • President Donald Trump assumed power Friday with a fiercely nationalistic vow to put "America first," declaring a new political era after being sworn in as the 45th US head of state.
  • Hundreds of thousands of people stood in the rain-splattered National Mall to see the 70-year-old Republican billionaire take the oath of office and deliver a stridently populist call-to-arms.
  • Former US president Jimmy Carter and his wife Rosalynn arrive for the inauguration of President Trump.
  • Former US president Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
  • Former US President George W. Bush and his wife Laura.
  • Bush put up a struggle with his poncho.
  • American casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, a donor to the Trump campaign.
  • Senators Bernie Sanders and John McCain.
  • "From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land," Trump said, promising an end to business-as-usual in Washington.

    "From this moment on, it's going to be only America First."

  • "Today we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another or from one party to another, but we are transferring power from Washington, DC. And giving it back to you, the people."
  • While the US capital city no longer provides official crowd counts, the turnout was visibly smaller than for Barack Obama's two inaugurations, in 2009 and 2013, with sections of the Mall and bleachers along the parade route left empty.
  • And as the incoming leader rallied his supporters for the swearing-in, throngs of his opponents also converged on Washington.
  • Most of the protests - by an array of anti-racist, anti-war, feminist, LGBT, pro-immigration and marijuana legalization groups - were noisy but peaceful, though sporadic violence marred the day.
  • Between 400 and 500 masked, black-clad protesters carrying anarchist flags smashed windows, lit fires and scuffled with riot police in downtown Washington, blocks from the parade held in Trump's honour, with over 90 people arrested for vandalism.
  • Even the peaceful protesters were intent on spoiling Trump's party - letting out a deafening roar as the presidential limousine known as "The Beast" rolled by on the way to the White House.
  • "Not my president! Not my president!" they yelled, as the pro- Trump crowd in bleachers across the street chanted "USA! USA!".
  • Trump's inauguration caps the improbable rise to power of the Manhattan real estate magnate who has never before held elected office, served in government or in the armed forces.
  • His speech was far from the typical optimistic inaugural address that tries to bridge political divides and lift Americans' gaze up to the horizon.
  • It was a deliberate and striking contrast from the uplifting message of Obama, the outgoing president who was among the dignitaries in attendance.
  • Obama and his wife Michelle departed the Capitol by helicopter moments after the swearing-in ceremony, turning a page on eight years of Democratic leadership in the White House.
  • At a Congressional luncheon afterward, Trump led a standing ovation for his defeated election rival Hillary Clinton, saying he was "honoured" that she and her husband, former president Bill Clinton, attended his inauguration.
  • When Trump descended the escalators of his glitzy New York tower in June 2015, his run for office was roundly dismissed and even mocked.
  • Trump and First Lady Melania Trump dance during the Armed Forces ball at the National Building Museum.
  • Trump, the first lady Melania Trump, US Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen cut a cake after dancing at the Armed Services ball.

Shannon didn't remember him as particularly presidential, however.

"He was more like your bullish, personable, property developer type," he said.

Trump also did an ad for the Australian arm of Pizza Hut back in 2000, spruiking the chain's range of New Yorker Pizza.

Anti-Trump protests kick off ahead of his White House inauguration

  • US civil rights activists vowed on Jan 14, 2017 to defend hard-fought gains in voting rights and criminal justice during the presidency of Donald Trump, kicking off a week of protests ahead of the Republican's inauguration.
  • About 2,000 mostly black protesters ignored steady rain to march and rally near Washington's Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, as speakers urged them to fight for minority rights and President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, which Trump has vowed to dismantle.
  • The rally also included the Hispanic group La Raza, politicians, relatives of African-Americans slain by police, the National Urban League, Planned Parenthood and the Human Rights Campaign, an advocacy group for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civil rights.
  • The rally came hours after Trump blasted U.S. Representative John Lewis after the Georgia Democrat and civil rights campaigner said Russia's alleged hacking aimed at helping Trump put his legitimacy into question.
  • The Rev. Al Sharpton, the rally's organiser and a veteran civil rights leader, said Democrats in Congress needed to be sent a simple message: "Get some backbone."
  • About 30 groups, almost all of them anti-Trump, have gotten permits to protest before, during and after the inauguration. Thousands of demonstrators have vowed to shut down the inauguration.
  • The National Mall in Washington could become a sea of bright pink the day after Donald Trump is inaugurated as US president if the vision of a pair of Los Angeles women is realized.
  • For two months, Krista Suh and Jayna Zweiman have called on people around the world to make 1.17 million pink "pussyhats" for those attending the Women's March, a rally on Jan. 21 organized with hopes of bringing attention to civil and human rights issues.
  • The women have asked volunteers around the world to help sew, crochet or knit pink hats with ears by using simple patterns available on the project's website.
  • The name of the hats comes partly from President-elect Trump's comments in an infamous 2005 tape that came to light during his campaign in which, discussing women, he said: "Grab them by the pXXXX. You can do anything."
  • They say it is easier than knitting a scarf, the typical starter project for novices.
  • Marchers can get a hat by contacting a maker through an online distribution system, through social media or at sites in Washington.
  • Organizers have said the protest could draw around 200,000 people, but Suh and Zweiman decided to aim for the 1.17 million people that could feasibly fit in the Mall.
  • For some knitters at the "pussyhat party" on Jan 13, it was hard to put the needles down as the deadline nears.

"Napoleon. Alexander the Great. Donald Trump. We're all cut from the same cloth, and that cloth is very, very large," Trump says in the commercial.

Of course he'd compare himself to those two.

Don't you miss the days when Trump was just a larger-than-life businessman, and nothing more?

Read the full article here.


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