The man solving MH370

Blaine Alan Gibson has been called a modern-day Indiana Jones - though in temperament he's probably a lot closer to Sherlock Holmes.

Blaine Alan Gibson has been called a modern-day Indiana Jones - though in temperament he's probably a lot closer to Sherlock Holmes.

Gibson, 59, made headlines around the world earlier this year after he found debris from a Boeing 777 that was later confirmed to be a piece of the infamous Malaysia flight 370 aircraft, which went missing shortly after take-off on 8 March 2014 with 239 people on board.

After diligently working to transfer the panel to the authorities, Gibson stayed on the case, conducting his own unpaid investigation in 12 countries to solve the mystery of flight 370.

This isn't the first time he's tried to solve a puzzle. Journeys to Guatemala and Belize allowed him to develop a theory on the collapse of the Mayan civilisation; an overland expedition to Siberia was about getting to the bottom of the mysterious 1908 Tunguska explosion; and he's chased down the Lost Ark of the Covenant on the back roads and waterways of Ethiopia.

Gibson is a man who defies easy description.

He is a lawyer who has never practiced law, a businessman who isn't particularly focused on making money, and a traveller whose goal is to find clarity, not see the sights.

We linked up with Gibson in the Maldives, where he was searching for more flight 370 clues, to find out if a humble traveller can indeed solve some of the world's great mysteries.

Q: Where did your interest in travel come from?

I was born in San Francisco and grew up in the Bay Area and Carmel. My father was the Chief Justice of California so I grew up with politics, but I always loved travel.

I collected National Geographic magazines, and from a young age I was interested in memorizing where all the countries were located and what their capitals were.

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