Scotland 'yes' camp has too much ground to make up : analysts

Scotland 'yes' camp has too much ground to make up : analysts
British Prime Minister David Cameron engaged in a game of call my bluff by accepting to hold a referendum on September 18, convinced of being able to dash the separatist hopes of Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond (pictured here).

LONDON - Supporters of Scotland breaking away from the United Kingdom are making up some ground but with six months to go until the independence referendum, it is not enough, analysts say.

Armed with the slogan "Better Together", the three main London-based parties - the Conservatives of Prime Minister David Cameron, their Liberal Democrat coalition partners, and the opposition Labour party - have formed an improbable but resolute alliance to push the "no" vote.

British Prime Minister David Cameron engaged in a game of call my bluff by accepting to hold a referendum on September 18, convinced of being able to dash the separatist hopes of Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond.

In early March, 39.3 per cent of voters were in the "yes" camp, 47.6 per cent backed the "no" vote and 13.1 per cent were undecided, according to the Survation polling group who surveyed 1,002 people.

"Winning from here for Alex Salmond would be an astonishing achievement," said Michael Marra from the University of Dundee, who helped run the poll.

John Curtice, professor of politics at the University of Strathclyde, told AFP: "Something has happened - not necessarily a great deal. The 'yes' side is quite a long way behind."

For three decades, support for independence has been stuck at around a third of the Scottish electorate, but the gap has closed slightly since the turn of the year, Curtice noted.

Taking an average of polls since mid-2013, the "yes" vote has clawed back two to three percentage points.

"The Survation poll is interesting because it gives you a trend towards a 'yes', but they are still losing," said Peter Lynch, Curtice's colleague at Strathclyde.

Salmond places great store on the fact that the gap is narrowing - Scots, he insist, will reject "Project Fear" in favour of the "hope, aspiration and progress offered by a 'yes' vote."

More about

ireland
Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.