Fermented In Indonesia

Fermented In Indonesia
Mystique about the Moon.

Mizuma Gallery's latest group show brings together some of the most exciting names of the contemporary Indonesian art scene.

The exhibition, titled Fermented In Indonesia, is related to the discovery and development of the contemporary art scene in the country.

Artworks on display reflect the cultural diversity and draw on local traditions as well as social and political conditions. Indonesian artists are known for their creative use of materials and strong statements. You get to see that in 10 major artworks ranging from paintings to installations.

Where: Mizuma Gallery, 22 Lock Road, 01-34, Gillman Barracks MRT: Labrador When: Till June 22, 11am - 7pm (Tue to Sat). 11am - 6pm (Sun). Closed on Mon & public holidays Admission: Free Tel: 6570-2505 Info: www.mizuma.sg

1 CORAL REEF, 2011

By Made Wianta, oil, acrylic on canvas, 210x310cm

Wianta's Coral Reef gives his insights into the current condition of our planet.

Coral reefs are a crucial part of the ecological balance that is being disturbed. The artist has made a name for himself for his creative use of materials - ranging from paint and fabrics to razor blades - to comment on the ecological challenges we face. Born in Tabanan as the youngest of 10 children, the artist grew up in a musical and artistic household.

2 FLYING ANGELS, PART OF CIVILIZATION ODDNESS SERIES, 2014

By Heri Dono, mixed media, 160x170x20cm

Artist Heri Dono has always used angels to represent hope and freedom in his works. Political violence and cultural clashes in modern society are recurring themes in his art. Merging elements of storytelling, mythology, humour and music, his armless angels appear with red capes. He draws inspiration from wayang puppetry.

3 THE SPIRIT OF GUARDS, PART OF CIVILIZATION ODDNESS SERIES, 2014

By Heri Dono, mixed media, 160x100x65cm

This is the embodiment of spiritual guardians of the earth that protect humans from the cruelty of life and their own barbarism. The artist believes even though the human race has evolved, peace in the world remains a utopian dream.

Tapping on the rich Indonesian culture of myths and fables, his installations make references to the social and political realities in his country. His roots are in wayang kulit (shadow puppetry), which he studied with Sukasman, a famous Indonesian puppeteer, between 1987 and 1988.

The established artist is now a strong supporter of younger artists.

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