Malaysian designer behind swole Pokemon sees work ripped off and sold for profit

PHOTO: Facebook/Chan Yen Yee

When it comes to 3D printing and designs, the community has been able to pull off amazing custom designs simply with the will of imagination.

Creating custom works based on their favourite IPs such as Pokémon saw fellow 3D printing enthusiast Chan Yen Yee develop a rather whimsical series featuring starter Pokemon, Charizard, Bulbasaur, Squirtle, and Pikachu as muscle-bound Pokémon.

Ultra swole Pokemon group photo! Still working on Squirtle, also planning for next swole Pokemon entry (possibly Eevee...

Posted by Chan Yen Yee on Wednesday, April 22, 2020

With a body which would make every Machoke green with envy, these custom swole Pokémon designs earned the praise from the community.

ULTRA SWOLE POKEMON TRIO Tonight can start painting Charmander and Bulbasaur.

Posted by Chan Yen Yee on Sunday, April 5, 2020

Additionally, with Chan hand painting his designs, the concept really came together and it would seem to have caught the eye of profiteers.

I hate handpainting Maybe im using cheap rubbish acrylics

Posted by Chan Yen Yee on Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Slightly over a month since the initial designs were released, toy stores from Taiwan and Philippines were taking pre-orders for Chan’s designs. 

Yesterday found out my swole Pokemon designs stolen by a garage-kit company and they mass-producing it, a toy shop from...

Posted by Chan Yen Yee on Friday, May 22, 2020

The troubling thing here is the profiteering over an indie’s custom designs and also passing it off as their own.

Given the 3D printing community is one of mutual respect and the free exchange of shared knowledge the sale of Chan’s designs as toys by retail stores is a vile act which should not be condoned.

With Squirtle currently in the works, we hope that this episode does not dissuade Chan from crafting more designs in a similar vein.

In the meantime, we can do our part to not feed the retailers who are looking to cash out on the community’s efforts.

This article was first published in Geek Culture