Thought Ambush's clothes peg earring was wild? Here are 3 more mind-blowing accessories

PHOTO: Farfetch.com

From $1,000 tin cans to carabiner heels (you can’t make these things up), we’ve shortlisted some of the quirkier accessories you can find on the Internet in case you’re a purveyor of the finer, odder things in life.

ICYMI, Mothership recently wrote an article about a $760 earring (yes, singular) that’s driving the Internet wild. What’s so special about it, you ask?

Apart from its ridiculous price tag, this earring would probably come in handy if you needed an extra clothes peg for your laundry — because that’s literally what it is.

The clothes peg earring in all its glory. We most certainly haven’t seen this colourway in the mamak shops before!
PHOTO: Farfetch.com

This got us thinking about what else is there on the virtual shelves of the World Wide Web. After all, many expensive yet relatively useless items were very well-received in the past. Remember when Supreme sold bricks and when Gucci sold pre-ripped leggings? Yeah.

We took the liberty to source for some fun, impractical and expensive accessories just in case you have some extra dough to spare. (And if you’re all in, check out our shortlist of the 10 most expensive beauty items in the market while you’re at it. Because, why not?)

When you have a meeting at 5pm but need to rock climb at 6pm

1. Carabiner Heels by Filling Pieces

PHOTO: Fillingpieces.com

If we’re being honest, this is one sick pair of heels. Is it impractical? Yes. Odd? Slightly. But you can’t deny that it’s most definitely a head-turner if that’s what you’re gunning for.

At a whopping €350 (~S$566), these boss heels definitely walk the talk. Crafted using smooth, luxurious black leather, these 10cm-tall heels are also fitted with easy-to-fasten magnetic ankle straps for extra comfort.

The star of the show is, of course, the carabiner heel that’s been embossed, bearing Filling Pieces’ iconic logo. Modified ever-so-slightly to ensure that it can hold your weight and keep you in balance, the carabiner remains functional.

So you can technically use your heels as you scale a rock wall, or if you decide you want to parachute at some point in your life. The possibilities are endless.

Purchase it in Euros here .

How about turning one man’s trash into another man’s treasure? Well, can is can.

2. Sterling Silver Tin Can by Tiffany & Co

PHOTO: Tiffany.com

Yes, you’re looking at a tin can that’s priced at US$1500 (~S$1998). Unlike the ones you typically throw once its contents have been emptied, this piece by Tiffany & Co is made entirely from sterling silver and vermeil.

It even comes with their iconic Tiffany Blue® enamel accent, just to give this otherwise boring piece a classy, modern look.

While we’re not entirely sure why they chose to recreate the humble tin can, at least it has some utilitarian value. Use it to hold your stationery or turn it into a fancy coffee cup; whatever you do, just make sure no one mistakenly throws it away!

Purchase it in USD here .

Last but not least, here’s an ingenious way to cut down on those cigarettes.

3. Cigarette Case Beaded Necklace by Ambush

PHOTO: Farfetch.com

Brought to you by the same folks behind the infamous clothes peg earring, we present to you a wearable cigarette case that stores just a single stick!

Positioned as a fun and novel way to quit smoking, we do see the appeal, albeit the hefty price tag.

Yours for US$1580, this piece is made from sterling silver and comes with a lovely multi-colour bead detailing, which we hear is in vogue these days. Too expensive for your liking? Fret not! You can get your paws on this from as low as US$203, and in a variety of materials and colours.

Purchase it in USD here .

To buy or not to buy?

That really is the question. While we’re not too hot on lavish spending (especially on these impractical and extra items), we don’t judge nor discriminate! Whatever it is, don’t forget to check out our ultimate online shopping cheat sheet – we promise that it’ll come in handy.

This article was first published in YouTrip.