TraceTogether app's possible Covid-19 exposure alert removed after app update

The possible exposure feature on the TraceTogether app was introduced in July last year.
PHOTO: The Straits Times

SINGAPORE - The possible exposure feature on the TraceTogether application has been removed, as the Ministry of Health (MOH) has created new categories of health alerts to manage the Covid-19 pandemic.

With the evolving coronavirus situation, the ministry has designed these new categories that make more sophisticated use of TraceTogether, SafeEntry and other relevant data, said an update to the frequently asked questions (FAQs) on the TraceTogether app.

These health alerts and warnings are tiered based on MOH's assessment of the individual's risk level of infection, and have been useful in helping it manage the Covid-19 outbreak, said the update.

"With the new categories of Covid-19 health alerts, there is no longer a need for possible exposure alerts."

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The FAQs also suggested that the possible exposure alert might be misconstrued by some businesses as indicating that an individual has a high risk of becoming a Covid-19 patient, resulting in the individual being inappropriately denied entry to the premises.

Removing the feature will prevent confusion among users and businesses in the light of the vaccination-differentiated safe management measures.

The possible exposure feature on the TraceTogether app, as well as wereyouthere.safeentry.gov.sg, were introduced in July last year. The intention was to advise users with low exposure risk - and hence not placed on quarantine or phone surveillance - to self-monitor their health for 14 days.

The update said an individual who is assessed by MOH to be at a higher risk of being infected will still be informed through SMS or a call.

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This article was first published in The Straits TimesPermission required for reproduction.