5 iconic furniture designer names you need to be familiar with

PHOTO: Tom Dixon

For the houseproud, owning an item by Philippe Starck or Verner Panton is the equivalent of a coveted designer bag or pair of shoes for the fashionista.

Whether you love dramatic conversation starters or more understated homeware, there's no denying that a good designer piece is worth investing in - even if only for the bragging rights.

For those thinking of making a purchase, here are five designer names you absolutely need to know.

1. Arne Jacobsen

PHOTO: Arne Jacobsen

You may recognise some of Arne Jacobsen's iconic chairs on sight, like the Egg and the Swan.

The early 20th-century Danish designer is well known for clean lines, beautiful proportions and the balance of function and style in his works.

2. Charles and Ray Eames

PHOTO: Charles and Ray Earnes

One of the most famous couples in design, Charles and Ray Eames are partners at work and by marriage.

The American duo is known for mid-century designs and classic icons like the La Chaise free-form daybed one could either sit or lie on and the Eiffel Chair, so named for its resemblance to the famous Parisian tower.

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3. Philippe Starck

PHOTO: Philippe Starck

A household name when it comes to sleek, modern designs, the French designer and architect has worked with several brands such as Kartell and Alessi to produce some of the most iconic furniture and accessories around today.

Some of his most famous creations include the Ghost chair with an entirely transparent body and the Juicy Salif for Alessi, a citrus squeezer that resembles an alien spaceship.

4. Tom Dixon

PHOTO: Tom Dixon

The self-taught British designer became known for his creativity in designs such as the sinuous S Chair and the Jack lamp that resembles an abstract molecule.

His creations defy the ordinary and make great conversation starters.

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5. Verner Panton

PHOTO: Verner Panton

Bright colours and geometric shapes typify the work of this Danish designer who worked with Arne Jacobsen's architectural firm from 1950 to 1952.

His works, like the Heart Chair and the Flowerpot Lamp, are minimalist yet playful.

This article was first published in Home & Decor.