Your guide to road markings in Singapore

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After passing the Basic Theory Test (BTT), most drivers would often forget the meaning of different line markings on the road. Even seasoned drivers fall victim to these road markings every now and then as they struggle to decipher the meaning behind the lines.

Hence, we have crafted a complete guide on the most common road markings seen in Singapore for inexperienced drivers to refer to and as a refresher for the veterans.

Common road markings

  • Single broken white line

Starting with the basics, a broken white line indicates the centre of a two-way road.

Drivers should always keep to the left of this road marking.

Motorists can cross the centre of this road marking when they can see that the road ahead is clear and that it is safe to do so.

  • Continuous white line

Like the single broken white line, a continuous white line indicates the centre of a two-way road. Drivers should also always keep to the left of this road marking.

Motorists can cross the centre of this line when they can see that the road ahead is clear and that it is safe to do so. However, parking is not allowed on either side of the road with this road marking.

Drivers who park on roads with a continuous white line will be fined up to $150, depending on the type of vehicle.

  • Parallel continuous white lines

Moving on to a more complicated road marking, parallel continuous white lines on a two-way road indicate that parking is not allowed on either side of the road. Motorists are not allowed to cross the centre of this road marking. Drivers are also not allowed to make a U-turn or a right turn.

If you see this road marking painted on a road to separate traffic flowing in different directions, take note that you are not allowed to overtake any vehicle unless you can keep entirely to the left of the lines.

Drivers who cross these parallel continuous white lines will receive four demerit points and a fine of up to $200, depending on the type of vehicle. For performing an unauthorized U-turn, drivers will be fined up to $150.

  • Continuous yellow line

Roads marked with a continuous yellow line indicate that parking is not allowed between 7:00am and 7:00pm on the side where it is drawn, except on Sundays and public holidays.

Drivers may drop off and pick up passengers along a continuous yellow.

However, drivers who park on roads with a continuous yellow line will be fined up to $150, depending on the type of vehicle.

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  • Parallel continuous yellow lines

Roads marked with parallel continuous yellow lines indicate that parking and waiting are not allowed at all times on the side where it is drawn, except for the immediate picking up and letting down of passengers.

Drivers who park on roads with parallel continuous yellow lines will be fined up to $150, depending on the type of vehicle.

  • Single yellow zig-zag line

Roads marked with a single yellow line indicate that parking is not allowed at all times on the side where it is drawn, except for the immediate picking up and letting down of passengers.

Drivers who park on roads with a single yellow zig-zag line will receive 3 demerit points and be fined up to $300, depending on the type of vehicle.

  • Double yellow zig-zag lines

Roads marked with double yellow zig-zag lines indicate that motorists are not allowed to stop at the side of the road where it is drawn at all times.

Drivers who stop on roads with double yellow zig-zag lines will receive three demerit points and be fined up to $300, depending on the type of vehicle.

  • Zig-zag lines by side of the road

Not to be confused with a single zig-zag line at the side of the road, this road marking is to warn drivers that there is a pedestrian crossing up ahead.

Vehicles are not allowed to overtake, wait, or park in the area of this road marking. Pedestrians are not allowed to cross the road at these zig-zag areas as well.

Drivers who park within pedestrian crossings will receive three demerit points and be fined up to $200, depending on the type of vehicle.

  • Traffic calming markings

These triangular road markings on both sides of the road encourage drivers to slow down as they create a visually narrowed road.

These road markings are typically found near school zones and silver zones.

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Bus lanes

During restricted hours, only omnibuses, bicycles and emergency service and police vehicles are allowed to use the bus lanes.

Non-scheduled buses (school or factory buses) can use the lane as well, but these vehicles are not allowed to stop, pick up or let their passengers alight while driving in the lane.

  • Normal bus lane

Normal bus lanes are marked by a continuous yellow line and a short horizontal line at intervals

Vehicles are not allowed to drive or park inside the lane during the operational hours from Mondays to Fridays, 7:30am to 9:30am and 5:00pm to 8:00pm An exception to this rule applies on Saturdays, Sundays, and public holidays.

If the lane has a broken yellow line, vehicles are allowed to turn from the bus lane into a side road or vice versa.

Drivers who ignore bus lane timings and drive in bus lanes will be fined up to $130. Refusal to pay the fine will result in a maximum fine of $1,000 or 3 months of imprisonment.

  • Full-day bus lane

Full-day bus lanes are marked by an additional red line parallel to the continuous yellow line.

Vehicles are not allowed to drive or park inside the lane during operational hours from Mondays to Saturdays, 7.30am to 11.00pm An exception to this rule applies on Sundays and public holidays.

Similarly, drivers who ignore bus lane timings and drive in bus lanes will be fined up to $130. Refusal to pay the fine will result in a maximum fine of $1,000 or three months of imprisonment.

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This article was first published in sgCarMart.