Singapore Airlines pilot dies after motorbike accident in Kuala Lumpur

Photos circulating on Facebook show a red-and-white motorbike with a Singapore-registered motorcycle number plate leaning on a road shoulder.
Facebook/Ha Nyut

SINGAPORE - A Singapore Airlines (SIA) pilot has died after a motorbike accident in Kuala Lumpur on Wednesday (Aug 22).

Photos circulating on Facebook show a red-and-white motorbike with a Singapore-registered motorcycle number plate leaning on a road shoulder. Netizen Ha Nyut, who shared the post, said the accident happened in Kuala Lumpur and that the rider died on the spot.

The Straits Times understands that the victim in the accident is Mr Eugene Wang, a 46-year-old pilot with SIA.

A post on Mr Wang's Facebook page, uploaded by his wife in the wee hours of Thursday morning, said: "In loving memory of my loving husband Eugene Bernard Wang. 10th August 1972 to 22nd August 2018."

[embed]https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10156530035753340[/embed]

In response to queries from ST, SIA said that one of its pilots has died.

A spokesman said: "SIA deeply regrets to confirm that one of our pilots passed away on Aug 22. Our immediate priority is to provide the necessary assistance to the family of the pilot.

"For privacy purposes, we are unable to share any further details. Our condolences go out to the family of the pilot at this time."

According to Mr Wang's Facebook profile, he hailed from Kuala Lumpur and lived in Pasir Ris.

Posts from friends on his Facebook page paid tribute to him and also offered condolences to his family.

Daniel Chia posted: "We've lost a great friend and a pilot. His humour and laughter will be particularly missed. His love for family was always evident, wherever he was, no doubt about that.

"He was a proud Malaysian. The country lost a good son, anak Malaysia. You're da man bro."

Another Facebook user, Suhaimi Saman, said: "Ask me to name an excellent gentleman and family man, I'd name Eugene Wang without delay.

"Rest in peace Sir."

This article was first published in The Straits Times. Permission required for reproduction.